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May 21, 2015, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
ADE Triple Threat – Moving from Awareness to Action
 Session Overview

Over our last three webinars, leading experts have presented an in-depth review of ADEs relating to Anticoagulation, Diabetic agents, and Opioid medications, as well as the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan) published by HHS last year. The interest and attendance of our Research Test Bed was overwhelmingly positive and we are pleased to present one capstone webinar that will bring it all together ... both the topics and the experts!

Our experts have generously agreed to lead our webinar in an interactive panel discussion that will focus on moving from awareness of the problem to a tangible action plan from readily available resources.

We are proud to have Dr. Alan Jacobson, from VA Loma Linda, join us again. Dr. Jacobson is a pioneer and leader in the field of anticoagulation management, having implemented innovative strategies within the VA system to improve anticoagulation management and dramatically reducing risk with out-of-range INR and other complications associated with anticoagulation therapy. Joining Dr. Jacobson will be Dr. Gladstone McDowell, Medical Director of Integrated Pain Solutions. Dr. McDowell will speak on the topic of pain management and the use and misuse of opioid medications. He will discuss current strategies to optimize opioid use in the context of the "5 Rights of Pain Care®."

Also speaking will be Dr. Mary Andrawis, PharmD, MPH, Senior Advisor, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid. Dr. Andrawis will address the topic of anti-diabetic agents and the use and misuse of anti-diabetic medications. According to 2010 data from the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System (MPSMS) on ADEs, 57 percent nationally are due to hypoglycemic agents. Hypoglycemic agents cause complications in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Dr. Andrawis will discuss current strategies to optimize anti-diabetic agent use in the context of the "Inpatient: Scope of Problem and Challenges." Finally, Leonard Pogach, MD, MBA, FACP, will also be part of the group, providing an overview on "Prevention of Serious Hypoglycemic Events in Outpatient Settings." Dr. Pogach is the National Director of Medicine at Veterans Affairs Central Office, and is a recognized national expert, currently focusing on of large administrative data sets to evaluate ambulatory quality of care, and their impact upon prevention quality indicators among veterans with diabetes.

After the presentations, our speakers will be joined by members of a reactor panel who will discuss the key takeaways with our experts, and will respond to questions from our webinar participants.
Webinar Video and Downloads



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Speaker Slide Sets:

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Registration Information and CE Credit Information:
 Register:
Click here to register for this Webinar.

 When:  May 21, 2015 Time: 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. ET
We are accepting questions now that relate to the session topics. Please e-mail any questions related to the specific session to webinars@safetyleaders.org with the session title in the e-mail message header.
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Learning Objectives

Participants will be informed on:

  • Awareness: Participants will understand and be able to communicate the frequency, severity, and preventability of certain errors, and harm due to the top three ADE types from Anticoagulation medications, Opioids, and Diabetic agents, and be made aware of existing resources to address those ADEs.
  • Accountability: Participants will understand WHO is accountable for new behaviors to protect patients and caregivers from errors and harm related to the top three ADEs.
  • Ability: Participants will learn the principles of importance in education and how to enable key actors to reduce errors and harm related to the top three ADEs.
  • Action: Participants will learn what direct line-of-sight actions must be taken to prevent harm and reduce errors related to the top three ADEs.

CE Participation Documentation

Texas Medical Institute of Technology, approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 15996, will be issuing 1.5 contact hours for this webinar. TMIT is only providing nursing credit at this time.

To request a Participation Document, please click here.

 Session Speakers
Alan K. Jacobson, MD, FACC
Anticoagulation Related ADEs From Awareness to Action

Alan K. Jacobson, MD, FACC, is a staff cardiologist and the Associate Chief of Staff for Research at the Loma Linda VA Medical Center in Southern California. A native of Canada, Dr. Jacobson has been at Loma Linda since heading south in 1977 for medical school. In addition to practicing general cardiology, Dr. Jacobson has a special interest in antithrombotic therapy.
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Gladstone C. McDowell, II, MD
Opioid Related ADEs From Awareness to Action

Dr. McDowell is Medical Director of Integrated Pain Solutions. His areas of expertise include urology, anesthesiology, pain management, and patient safety. He has served as an instructor at The University of Ohio for both the Department of Urology and the Department of Surgery.
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Mary A. Andrawis, PharmD, MPH
Diabetic Agent Related ADEs From Awareness to Action

Mary A. Andrawis, PharmD, MPH, is a Senior Advisor at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Andrawis trained in pharmacy leadership through Johns Hopkins Hospital's Pharmacy Administration residency in Baltimore, MD, a two-year program combining intense clinical activities with administrative training in quality improvement, patient safety, and emergency preparedness.
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Leonard Pogach, MD, MBA
Diabetic Agent Related ADEs From Awareness to Action

Leonard Pogach, MD, MBA, FACP, was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, received his MD degree from Hahnemann Medical College; completed an Internal Medicine Residency at Temple University Health Sciences Center; was awarded a fellowship in Endocrinology and Metabolism at Boston University Health Sciences Center; and obtained a Master’s in Business Administration from Seton Hall University. He spent his postgraduate career at the Department of Veterans Affairs New Jersey Health Care System (VANJHCS)/East Orange VA Medical Center from 1981 to 2012, before assuming his current position as the National Director for Medicine, Office of Specialty Care/Patient Care Services, Veterans Affairs Central Office.
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 Patient Safety Advocate
Jennifer Dingman
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations AND The Voice of Patient and Family

Jennifer Dingman realized, after her mother's death in 1995 due to errors in medical diagnoses and treatment, that there is little to no help available for patients and their families in similar situations. This life-changing experience left her feeling vulnerable, and she decided to dedicate her life to help prevent medical tragedies from happening to others.
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 Moderator and Introduction/Presenter
Charles R. Denham, MD
Welcome and Introduction AND Opening Presentaton: A Triple Threat of ADEs Demanding Innovation: Now Moving from Awareness to Action

During Dr. Denham's business development career spanning 30 years, he and his organizations have served hundreds of innovation teams. While in practice as a radiation oncologist, he taught biomedical engineering and product development. He has taught innovation adoption, technology transfer, and commercialization in both academia and industry. He has been an adjunct Professor of Health Services Engineering at the...
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 Reaction Panelist
Franck Guilloteau
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

During the past 20 years with HCC Corporation, Franck Guilloteau has led multiple projects, spanning industry segments from aerospace and consumer products to software and fitness. As Chief Technology Officer, Mr. Guilloteau takes the lead role in developing Software as a Service (SaaS) offerings and knowledge management systems used by HCC's global partners, while keeping HCC on the leading edge of technological advancements in multimedia, IT, e-commerce, and product development.
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Related Resources
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