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TMIT
May 19, 2016, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
High Impact Care Hazards: Opioid OD, Anaphylaxis,
Cardiac Arrest, Choking, and On-site Transportation Accidents
 Session Overview

This month's webinar addresses other leading causes of death of students K-12, colleges, and young employees. The topics include practical issues addressing Opioid Overdose, Anaphylaxis, Cardiac Arrest, Choking, On-site Transportation accidents, Bullying and Abuse of Power that can lead to workplace and school violence, active shooter events, and the value of a Rapid Response Team approach in schools and institutions. Our audience response to last month's Opioid related adverse events was terrific and led us to take a deep dive on the leading causes of death of young people – students at schools, colleges, and on the job.

We are proud to have Dr. Greg Botz, a national Intensive Care and patient safety leader, address the High Impact Care Hazards facing schools, colleges, and healthcare institutions. He will address the critical knowledge, lifeline behaviors or competencies that must be learned, and how assessment of such competencies may be undertaken. We introduce a new Medical-Tactical Certificate program that students can help lead in their school, college, or medical school.

Dr. Toff Peabody, a leading Emergency Medicine physician, will update us on the Dream Team concept successfully used in graduate training programs to combat burn out and introduce a new program being launched for Pre-med students.

Students from leading Texas universities will react to the discussions as well as leading patient advocates.

Webinar Video and Downloads



KVUE Reports on plan to have "Save Shot" on UT Campus (Narcan)


Dr. Greg Botz - Simulation of Narcan Auto Injector


Click here to download the Polling Data.     

Speaker Slide Sets:

Click here to download the combined speakers' slide set in PDF format – one (1) slide per page.     

Click here to download the combined speakers' slide set in PDF format – four (4) slides per page.     

To view the file, click the desired link (please note: the files may take several minutes to download). To save to your hard drive, right click on the link and choose "Save Target As." (In some browsers it might say "Save Link As.")

The slide set could take several minutes to download. The "four per page" slide set may download more efficiently.
Registration Information and CE Credit Information:
 Register:
Click here to register for this Webinar.

 When:  May 19, 2016 Time: 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. ET
We are accepting questions now that relate to the session topics. Please e-mail any questions related to the specific session to webinars@safetyleaders.org with the session title in the e-mail message header.
  • Questions about the Webinar series?
    E-mail webinars@safetyleaders.org or call 512-473-2370 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. CT.
  • Need technical assistance with registration? Call 512-457-7605 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. CT.

Learning Objectives:

  • AWARENESS: Participants will become aware of new and current risks to students, patients, caregivers, and families including Anaphylaxis, Cardiac Arrest, Opioid Overdose, On-site Transportation accidents, Bullying and Abuse of Power, Active Shooter Events, and the value of a Rapid Response Team approach.
  • ACCOUNTABILITY: Participants will learn about accountabilities that may be assigned to address these High Impact Care Hazards.
  • ABILITY: Participants will learn some of the important best practices to address the High Impact Care Hazards.
  • ACTION: Participants will have an understanding of what actions can be taken to target these High Impact Care Hazards.

CE Participation Documentation

Texas Medical Institute of Technology, approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 15996, will be issuing 1.5 contact hours for this webinar. TMIT is only providing nursing credit at this time.

To request a Participation Document, please click here.

 Introduction and Moderator
Charles R. Denham, MD
Welcome and In the News

During Dr. Denham's business development career spanning 30 years, he and his organizations have served hundreds of innovation teams. While in practice as a radiation oncologist, he taught biomedical engineering and product development. He has taught innovation adoption, technology transfer, and commercialization in both academia and industry. He has been an adjunct Professor of Health Services Engineering at the...
Read more...

 Session Speaker
Gregory H. Botz, M.D., FCCM
High Impact Care Hazards to Patients, Students, and Employees (recorded)

Gregory H. Botz, MD, FCCM, is a professor in the Department of Critical Care at the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center. He received his medical degree from George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Huntington Memorial Hospital and then completed a residency in anesthesiology and a fellowship in critical care medicine at Stanford University in California. He also completed a medical simulation fellowship at Stanford with Dr. David Gaba and the Laboratory for Human Performance in Healthcare. Dr. Botz is board-certified in anesthesiology and critical care medicine. He is a Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine.
Read more...

Christopher R. Peabody, MD, MPH
Dream Team Concept and Update: Pre-med Program

Christopher R. Peabody, MD, MPH, is an Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, at the University of California, San Francisco. He has a strong commitment to public service and healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations. Dr. Peabody completed his residency at one of the busiest safety-net hospitals in the country, Los Angeles County Hospital and was the Chief Resident in Emergency Medicine at the University of Southern California.
Read more...

 Reaction Panelists
Blake Settle
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

Blake Settle is a student at the University of Texas in Austin, and a Co-founder of the Med-Tac Certificate Course.
Bio not available

Stephanie Settle
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

Stephanie Settle is a student of the University of Texas in Austin, and a Co-founder of the National Dream Team Program for Pre-Med Students.
Bio not available

Arlene Salamendra
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

Arlene Salamendra is a former Board member and Staff Coordinator of Families Advocating Injury Reduction (FAIR). A number of years ago, she was the subject of a preventable medical error. Since that time, she has devoted a portion of her time to giving support to other patients...
Read more...

Jennifer Dingman
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

Jennifer Dingman realized, after her mother's death in 1995 due to errors in medical diagnoses and treatment, that there is little to no help available for patients and their families in similar situations. This life-changing experience left her feeling vulnerable, and she decided to dedicate her life to help prevent medical tragedies from happening to others.
Read more...

Related Resources
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  2. [No authors listed]. A report to congressional requestors. WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Additional Efforts Needed to Help Protect Health Care Workers from Workplace Violence. Government Accountability Office, March 2016. Available at http://www.gao.gov/assets/680/675858.pdf.     
  3. Rivara, F, LeMenestral S Editors, Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medicine. The National Academic Press, May 10, 2016. Available at https://assets.documentcloud.org/documents/2828281/Preventing-Bullying.pdf.     
  4. Satterly SC Jr. Report of Relative Risks of Death ion U.S. K-12 Schools. Safe Havens International, August 1, 2014. Available at http://safehavensinternational.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Relative_Risks_of_Death_in_U.S._K-12_Schools.pdf.     
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  18. Islam MM, McRae IS. An inevitable wave of prescription drug monitoring programs in the context of prescription opioids: pros, cons and tensions. BMC Pharmacol Toxicol 2014 Aug 16;15:46. Available at http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/2050-6511-15-46.pdf.     
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  25. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2014. Available at http://www.health.gov/hai/pdfs/ADE-Action-Plan-508c.pdf.     
  26. AHRQ. Efforts to improve patient safety result in 1.3 million fewer patient harms: Interim update on 2013 annual hospital-acquired condition rate and estimates of cost savings and deaths averted from 2010 to 2013. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2014 Dec. Available at http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/pfp/interimhacrate2013.html.     
  27. Denham CR. Is your hospital as safe as your bank? - Time to ask your board. J Patient Saf 2009 Jun;5(2):122-6. Available at http://journals.lww.com/journalpatientsafety/Citation/2009/06000/Is_Your_Hospital_as_Safe_as_Your_Bank__Time_to_Ask.12.aspx.     
  28. Chou R, Turner JA, Devine EB, et al. The effectiveness and risks of long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain: a systematic review for a national institutes of health pathways to prevention workshop. Ann Intern Med 2015 Feb 17;162(4):276-86. Available at http://annals.org/data/Journals/AIM/932765/0000605-201502170-00006.pdf.     
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  30. National Quality Forum. Safe Practice 2: Culture Measurement, Feedback, and Intervention. IN: Safe Practices for Better Healthcare – 2010 Update: A Consensus Report. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum; 2010. Available at http://www.qualityforum.org/Publications/2010/04/Safe_Practices_for_Better_Healthcare_%E2%80%93_2010_Update.aspx.     
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