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TMIT
September 15, 2016, 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm CT/1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
Harmonizing Healthcare Emergency Codes
 Session Overview
Leaders who have successfully harmonized their emergency codes will speak on lessons learned from this vital issue. With the frequency and severity of active shooter events, healthcare facility terrorism, and natural disasters striking healthcare institutions, coordination of the communication of emergency codes is critical. The discussion of the "how to" harmonize emergency codes and implementing plain language and simple text principles to improve effectiveness will be discussed. Stories illustrating how confusion regarding codes can lead to preventable deaths will be shared.

Dr. Bill Scharf and his colleagues at OSF have successfully accomplished harmonization of emergency codes across their health system and will share their experience. James Mitchell and Aaron Freedkin of Texas Children's Hospital will describe their journey to harmonizing their emergency codes and moving to plain language for the world's largest children's hospital.

In our reactor panel, Chief Bill Adcox, Inspector Vickie King, and Dr. Greg Botz of MD Anderson Cancer Center will discuss the importance of standardization at major medical centers where multiple institutions share common sky walkways and common areas as well as have caregivers and staff who rotate through multiple areas where differing emergency codes are used. Jennifer Dingman will discuss the perspectives of the patient and the family.
Webinar Video and Downloads



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Registration Information and CE Credit Information:
 Register:
Registration is closed for the 'live' online version of this webinar. You can view the entire webinar by watching the video above.

 When:  September 15, 2016  Time: 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm CT/1:00 pm - 2:30 pm ET
We are accepting questions now that relate to the session topics. Please e-mail any questions related to the specific session to webinars@safetyleaders.org with the session title in the e-mail message header.
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Learning Objectives:

  • Awareness: Participants will understand and be able to communicate the value of harmonizing emergency codes and will have an understanding of the value of plain language and simple text concepts.
  • Accountability: Participants will understand who is accountable for responding to, and prioritizing, the opportunities for harmonizing emergency codes.
  • Ability: Participants will learn the principles of harmonization of quality standards down to the specification level.
  • Action: Participants will learn about existing emergency code standards and what actions they may need to take in their organizations.

CE Participation Documentation

Texas Medical Institute of Technology, approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 15996, will be issuing 1.5 contact hours for this webinar. TMIT is only providing nursing credit at this time.

To request a Participation Document, please click here.

 Session Speakers
William R. Scharf, MD
Harmonizing Emergency Codes – Lessons Learned

William R. Scharf, MD, is a Physician Change Agent in the Division of Clinical Excellence with OSF HealthCare Systems. He graduated from Illinois Wesleyan University, and received his medical degree from the University of Illinois in Chicago. Dr. Scharf received postdoctoral training in general surgery from the University of Illinois Hospital, Cook County Hospital, and the West Side Veterans Administration Hospital in Chicago.
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Ode Keil MS, MBA
Harmonizing Emergency Codes – Lessons Learned

Mr. Keil has 41 years of direct experience in the healthcare field of facilities management. Mr. Keil's background includes 15 years of direct experience in the management of healthcare facilities, 13 years as the Director of Plant and Technology Management for the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations®.
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James Mitchell
The Journey to Plain Language Emergency Codes

James Mitchell, MBA, joined Texas Children’s in September of 2015 and has an extensive background in Crisis Management, Business Continuity and IT Disaster Recovery in both the Energy (BP) and Investments (Invesco) industries. While at Invesco, James developed the IT Crisis Management and Disaster Recovery process as well as developing and leading an international team to drive these efforts.
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Aaron S. Freedkin, MS, CHEP, EMT
The Journey to Plain Language Emergency Codes

Aaron Freedkin, MS, CHEP, EMT, Aaron Freedkin is the most recent addition to the Texas Children's Emergency Management Team having just arrived in May of 2016. Aaron previously served in Emergency Management with the U.T. MD Anderson Cancer Center in the Texas Medical Center for over 6 years. Prior to moving into the field of Emergency Management, Aaron worked in the field of Occupational Therapy for 12 years. He is an Emergency Medical Technician, is a Certified Health Emergency Professional, and has a Master of Science in Disaster & Emergency Management from Touro University.
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Charles R. Denham, MD
In the News and Polling Regarding Mortality Reviews

During Dr. Denham's business development career spanning 30 years, he and his organizations have served hundreds of innovation teams. While in practice as a radiation oncologist, he taught biomedical engineering and product development. He has taught innovation adoption, technology transfer, and commercialization in both academia and industry. He has been an adjunct Professor of Health Services Engineering at the...
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 Reaction Panelists
Gregory H. Botz, M.D., FCCM
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

Gregory H. Botz, MD, FCCM, is a professor in the Department of Critical Care at the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center. He received his medical degree from George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Huntington Memorial Hospital and then completed a residency in anesthesiology and a fellowship in critical care medicine at Stanford University in California. He also completed a medical simulation fellowship at Stanford with Dr. David Gaba and the Laboratory for Human Performance in Healthcare. Dr. Botz is board-certified in anesthesiology and critical care medicine. He is a Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine.
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Vicki King, MSCJ
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

During her 30-year career, Inspector Vicki King served 27 years with the Houston Police Department, rising to the rank of Assistant Chief and earning a master's degree in Criminal Justice. As Chief of Detectives, Tactical Support Commander, and Director of Forensic Services, she oversaw some of HPD's highest-profile cases, including serial homicides, corruption, domestic violence, sexual assaults, and gangland slayings.
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William H. Adcox, MBA
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations

With 37 years in municipal and campus policing, William H. Adcox serves as the Chief of Police and CSO at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Health Science Center. Chief Adcox holds an MBA degree from UTEP and is a graduate of the PERF's Senior Management Institute for Police and the Wharton School ASIS Program for Security Executives.
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Jennifer Dingman
Discussion and Reaction to Presentations AND The Voice of the Patient and Family

Jennifer Dingman realized, after her mother's death in 1995 due to errors in medical diagnoses and treatment, that there is little to no help available for patients and their families in similar situations. This life-changing experience left her feeling vulnerable, and she decided to dedicate her life to help prevent medical tragedies from happening to others.
Read more...

Related Resources
  1. Healthcare Security and Emergency Management Newsletter. Crack the uncommon code with standardization. Hcpro: 2004 Oct. Col 3 No 10. Pg 6. Available at http://www.hcpro.com/HOM-42311-742/Crack-the-uncommon-code-with-standardization.html  
  2. Keys VA, Selzler M. Emergency Code Color Standardization: Implementation Without Traumatization. Journal for Nurses in Staff Development. 2011. Available at href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21602633  
  3. Lalande F, RN, BSN. Standardization of Color-Coded Alerts: Time for a National Effort. PSQH. 2014 May 6. Available at http://www.psqh.com/news/standardization-of-color-coded-alerts-time-for-a-national-effort/  
  4. Wallace SC, Finley E. Standardized Emergency Codes May Minimize “Code Confusion”. Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory. 2015 Mar. Available at http://patientsafetyauthority.org/ADVISORIES/AdvisoryLibrary/2015/mar;12(1)/Pages/01.aspx  
  5. National Quality Forum. Safe Practice 1: Culture of Safety Leadership Structures and Systems. IN: Safe Practices for Better Healthcare – 2010 Update: A Consensus Report. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum; 2010. Available at http://www.qualityforum.org/Publications/2010/04/Safe_Practices_for_Better_Healthcare_%E2%80%93_2010_Update.aspx.   
  6. National Quality Forum. Safe Practice 2: Culture Measurement, Feedback, and Intervention. IN: Safe Practices for Better Healthcare – 2010 Update: A Consensus Report. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum; 2010. Available at http://www.qualityforum.org/Publications/2010/04/Safe_Practices_for_Better_Healthcare_%E2%80%93_2010_Update.aspx.   
  7. National Quality Forum. Safe Practice 3: Teamwork Training and Skill Building. IN: Safe Practices for Better Healthcare – 2010 Update: A Consensus Report. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum; 2010. Available at http://www.qualityforum.org/Publications/2010/04/Safe_Practices_for_Better_Healthcare_%E2%80%93_2010_Update.aspx.   
  8. National Quality Forum. Safe Practice 4: Risks and Hazards. IN: Safe Practices for Better Healthcare – 2010 Update: A Consensus Report. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum; 2010. Available at http://www.qualityforum.org/Publications/2010/04/Safe_Practices_for_Better_Healthcare_%E2%80%93_2010_Update.aspx.   
In the News
  1. Journal of Patient Safety (Entire Issue). September 2016. Available at http://journals.lww.com/journalpatientsafety/pages/currenttoc.aspx  
  2. Park M. Grandmother in heroin photo gets 180 days in jail. CNN. 2015 Sept 15. Available at http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/15/health/heroin-photo-woman-court/index.html  
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